Back to The Dripper


That crazed man approached, his head a frozen explosion of white cotton candy. Gesturing madly in his lab coat, he said to me, “Marky, we’ve got to go back! Back to the Dripper!”

“But Doctor, that’s impossible. The power necessary to fire that coil… too many jigawatts…” I half queried, half-exclaimed.

The congenial madman closed in, squaring his eyes to mine. Gripping my shoulders, he replied, “No. Not jigawatts. In fact, 30 watts is going to be plenty for where we’re going.”

Seduced by Simplicity

I admit it. I got sidetracked. You might even say I was seduced by the siren call of the RTA. The Kayfun, Aqua, Taifun… they drew me in. Especially the Kayfun. So buildable, so reliable, so versatile. As the days went on and the clouds blew by, I found myself using it almost exclusively.

Then one day I needed a dripper. While working on a review of several juices, I realized I needed to swap out flavors quickly and repeatedly. I dusted off the trusty Igo-W, TOBH and Atomic. You won’t believe what happened next.

OK, you will believe it. See, I was reminded how great it is to drip.

You Want Flavor? You Want Vapor?

When I think dripper, the first thing that comes to mind is flavor. There’s a reason for that. Even the best RTA just can’t compete with a dripper for pure taste sensation. Look, the Kayfun has great flavor (the Aqua even better). But when I want to really taste the juice, it’s got to be dripping time. And once you get used to a well-built RDA, it’s hard to be entirely satisfied with even the best RTA.

Furthermore, I’d become so accustomed to the tank lifestyle, I forgot what it was like to really blow clouds. A well-built Kayfun produces enough vapor when I’m at work or out in public, but at home, I want to paint the room with clouds. There’s still only one true king for cloud creation, and that’s the dripper. Even the baddest gennie doesn’t compare.

Let’s Get Nuts

As easy as it is to build a Kayfun, SQuape or Taifun (Aqua, get the fuck out of here, you complicated bastard), an RDA is easier. And it’s fun. There are fewer fiddly bits to fiddle, and you get instant payoff.

And when you want to get really crazy, the RDA is the most convenient coil-building platform. Twist that kanthal and build yourself a clapton coil. It’s gonna work great on an RDA. Quad coils? No problem. Octo-coils? You can do that, too! Vertical parrallel barrels? Why the fuck not?

Kickass Mods Make Kickass Clouds

In that time since I had really used an RDA I acquired some pretty kickass mods, capable of putting out more than the typical 4.7 volts of a mechanical. The great thing about a DNA20/30 or an OKR mod is you don’t NEED to build a sub-ohm coil to get great performance. Or you can if you want to. The versatility of this new wave of regulated mods makes dripping even better than I remembered.

I’m here to witness – you haven’t truly vaped til you’ve fired a killer quad-coil build on a 50 watt box mod.

Designs to Perform

Once, I was satisfied with my humble Igo-W and Immortalizer. But things have changed, baby. The newest generation of RDAs offers so much more. More deck room for unique builds. Unique and creative designs for easy quad coils. Deeper wells for extra juice. More airflow (don’t assume drilling airholes is automatically necessary).

The TOBH might be the best all-around RDA I’ve used. With FUNCTIONAL cooling fins (sorry, Patriot), a deeper juice well, and a removable top cap, it’s just about perfect. That top cap might be my favorite feature. It means you don’t have to take off the entire cap to refill, which means less juice all over your mod and/or hands.

The Nucleus is the RDA completely rethought and redesigned. There is no build deck. There’s a “core” that is removed from a central shaft (sounds tech-y and hot, huh?). You then build dual or quad coils (just go for quad) onto the core, and reinsert it into the body. Super easy, and it provides a huge juice well. Plus, you get to feel like a nuclear engineer.

But my current favorite RDA is probably the Magma, though it has one significant drawback. Designed for dual coils, lengthy wicks dip into a deep juice well that is partially chambered. It’s a delight to build and performs fantastically. My only issue is the top cap is screwed on. Filling through the drip tip hole is possible, but I prefer to remove the cap, which typically nudges the airflow ring out of place. Give me a Magma with a press-on top cap, and I’m ready to declare it the perfect RDA.

UPDATE: It’s tough these days to find the Magma, so you might want to try the Mutation X which is easy to build on and has air flow for days. Check out where to buy below.

We’ve Got to Go Back!

Are you sold yet? If you haven’t enjoyed some RDA love recently, I urge you to go back and visit. In today’s Aerotank, Nautilus and Kayfun dominated world, it’s easy to forget that dripping is still the purest, most satisfying form of vaping.


6 thoughts on “Back to The Dripper

  1. It isn’t fair to compare variable wattage and variable voltage. A DNA30 does fare better with larger coils (and therefore higher resistance), but an OKR build NEEDS to be sub-ohm to take full advantage of the regulator. The difference? How it adjusts….

  2. Michael, your minus with the Magma, that the top cap is screwed on – is actually my plus.
    Had several of those RDA’s where you can just take of the top cap, but I often lifte my mod from the top. What happens then, yeah – I stand there with the top cap in my hand – and the rest on the floor. So I love the Magma for that reason, even the Veritas where I hate those nuts for the coil is worse because you cant screw the top cap on. But now I await my Venturi RDA – as here I can screw my top cap on. So there, got yah (-:

  3. Big dripper,Squap relaoded, & Billow great for contus vap, going bak to my magma-tobe & helios. use /w vapor flsk dna40 & ivp30 & moraxus. For flavor and thick clouds please gige me your sub hom coil build.thanks wolfe

  4. Agree with this post. However, My dripper still doesn’t top my Aspire Cleito flavor wise. Then again I suck at building coils.


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